Immigration Reading List

Last Updated: 9/17/2014

View the Immigration Reading List Archive.

The Center's work is located on the Publication page.

We also offer the Immigration Reading List as an E-mail Update.

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS

1. House testimony on the threat posed by ISIS terrorists with Western passports
2. CRS report on U.S. restrictions on travel and remittances to Cuba
3. GAO reports on improving DHS training and management of research and development
4. U.K.: Quarterly immigration statistics
5. Norway: Statistics on labor immigration

REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

6 Rasmussen survey on voter opposition to administratiove amnesty
7 New report from FAIR: Estimated Cost of K-12 Public Education for Unaccompanied Alien Children
8 New report from Pew Research Center: As Growth Stalls, Unauthorized Immigrant Population Becomes More Settled
9 Four new working papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor
10 New working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research
11 Six new reports and features from the Migration Policy Institute
12. Eight new papers from the Social Science Research Network
13. New report from the International Organization for Migration
14. "Annotated Research Bibliography: H-1B/Green Card/STEM Labor Shortage Issues"
15. "The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations"
16. NCSL report on state immigration laws, 2014
17. "Immigration Enforcement and Crime Control: A Study of Secure Communities"
18. Migrant and Refugee Integration in Global Cities: The Role of Cities and Businesses
19. "Impacts of the Recent Economic Crisis (2008-2009) on International Migration"
19. "Parental Migration and Education of Left-Behind Children: A Comparison of Two Settings"
21. "Crossing the Border and Migration Duration"
22. "Overlooking/Looking Over Neoliberal Immigration: Amnesty Policy in the ‘Nation of Immigrants’"

BOOKS

23. Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border
24. The Right to Stay Home: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration
25. Facets of Women's Migration
26. Diasporas, Development and Peacemaking in the Horn of Africa
27. Asylum Seeking and the Global City

JOURNALS

28. Citizenship Studies
29. CSEM Newsletter
30. International Journal of Refugee Law
31. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
32. Journal of Refugee Studies

1.
Committee on Homeland Security
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security
September 10, 2014
http://homeland.house.gov/hearing/subcommittee-hearing-one-flight-away-examination-threat-posed-isis-terrorists-western

One Flight Away: An Examination of the Threat posed by ISIS Terrorists with Western Passports

Statement of Chairman Candice Miller
[at link above]

Witnesses testimony:

John P. Wagner
Assistant Commissioner
Office of Field Operations
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/HM/HM11/20140910/102635/HHRG-113-HM11-Wstate-WagnerJ-20140910.pdf

Troy Miller
Acting Assistant Commissioner
Intelligence and Investigative Liaison
U.S. Customs and Border Protection
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/HM/HM11/20140910/102635/HHRG-113-HM11-Wstate-MillerT-20140910.pdf

Jennifer A. Lasley
Deputy Under Secretary for Analysis
Office of Intelligence and Analysis
U.S. Department of Homeland Security
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/HM/HM11/20140910/102635/HHRG-113-HM11-Wstate-LasleyJ-20140910.pdf

Hillary Batjer Johnson
Acting Deputy Coordinator
Homeland Security and Multilateral Affairs
Bureau of Counterterrorism
U.S. Department of State
http://docs.house.gov/meetings/HM/HM11/20140910/102635/HHRG-113-HM11-Wstate-JohnsonH-20140910.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

2.
New from the Congressional Research Service

Cuba: U.S. Restrictions on Travel and Remittances
By Mark P. Sullivan
Congressional Research Service, August 19, 2014
http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/231256.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

3.
New from the General Accountability Office

DHS Training: Improved Documentation, Resource Tracking, and Performance Measurement Could Strengthen Efforts
Government Accountability Office, GAO-14-688, September 10, 2014
Report - http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665701.pdf
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-688

DHS: Actions Needed to Strengthen Management of Research and Development
Statement of David C. Maurer
Director, Homeland Security and Justice
Government Accountability Office, GAO-14-865T, September 9, 2014
Report - http://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665617.pdf
Highlights - http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-14-865T

Return to Top

********
********

4.
Immigration statistics, April to June 2014
U.K. Home Office, August 28, 2014
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2014/immigration-statistics-april-to-june-2014

Excerpt:

Removals and Voluntary Departures
There were 12% fewer (-1,744) enforced removals from the UK in the year ending June 2014 (12,415), the lowest figure since the series began in 2004.

However there was a much larger, 3,940 increase (+12%) in total voluntary departures, to 37,216. Over the same period the number of passengers refused entry at port and who subsequently departed increased by 3% (+424) to 14,671.

Return to Top

********
********

5.
Immigrants by reason for immigration, January 1, 2014
Statistics Norway, September 4, 2014
http://www.ssb.no/en/befolkning/statistikker/innvgrunn

Summary: Labour immigration remains high despite fall

A total of 54,500 persons with non-Nordic citizenship immigrated to Norway in 2013. This is a decrease of 2,200 persons compared with the record year 2012. Labour immigration showed the highest decrease, but was nevertheless still high.

+++

Processing time shortened for asylum seekers
September 1, 2014
http://www.ssb.no/en/befolkning/statistikker/innv_statres

Summary: In 2013, the case processing time for asylum applications in the Directorate of Immigration (UDI) was 72 per cent shorter compared with 2010, and the corresponding reduction for expulsion cases was 80 per cent. In the Immigration Appeal Board (UNE), processing times were shorter in 2013. The reduction is among other due to fewer arrears.

Return to Top

********
********

6.
Voters Strongly Oppose Obama's Amnesty Plan for Illegal Immigrants
Rasmussen Reports, September 4, 2014
http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/current_events/immigration/august_2014/voters_strongly_oppose_obama_s_amnesty_plan_for_illegal_immigrants

Excerpt:

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 62% of Likely U.S. Voters oppose the president granting amnesty to millions of illegal immigrants without the approval of Congress. Just 26% are in favor of Obama's plan, while 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Only 24% think the president has the legal authority to grant amnesty to these illegal immigrants without Congress’ approval. Fifty-seven percent (57%) believe the president does not have the legal right to do so. Eighteen percent (18%) are undecided.

If the president does grant amnesty to several million illegals, 55% of voters think Congress should challenge that action in court. Thirty percent (30%) disagree, while 14% are undecided.

Fifty-five percent (55%) of voters believe that when it comes to dealing with issues the president considers important to the nation, the government should only do what the president and Congress agree on. Thirty-five percent (35%) think Obama should take action alone if Congress does not approve the initiatives he has proposed. When it comes to his executive actions, a plurality (44%) thinks Obama has been less faithful to the U.S. Constitution than most other presidents.

Consistent with surveying for years, two-out-of-three voters (67%) think securing the border to prevent future illegal immigration should come before amnesty is granted for some illegal immigrants already in this country. Just 26% believe amnesty should come first.

Return to Top

********
********

7.
Estimated Cost of K-12 Public Education for Unaccompanied Alien Children
By Eric A. Ruark
FAIR Issue Brief, August 25, 2014
http://www.fairus.org/DocServer/research-pub/AlienMinors_EducationCosts_Aug2014.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

8.
As Growth Stalls, Unauthorized Immigrant Population Becomes More Settled
By Jeffrey S. Passel, Mark Hugo Lopez, and D’Vera Cohn
Pew Research Center, September 3, 2014
http://www.pewhispanic.org/files/2014/09/2014-09-03_Unauthorized-Final.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

9.
New from the Institute for the Study of Labor

Examining the Relationships between Labour Market Mismatches, Earnings and Job Satisfaction among Immigrant Graduates in Europe
By Seamus McGuinness and Delma Byrne
Discussion Paper No. 8440, August 2014
http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=8440

Migration, Economic Crisis and Adjustment in the UK
By Ken Clark, Stephen Drinkwater, and Catherine Robinson
Discussion Paper No. 8410, August 2014
http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=8410

Immigration, Cultural Distance and Natives' Attitudes Towards Immigrants: Evidence from Swiss Voting Results
By Beatrice Brunner and Andreas Kuhn
Discussion Paper No. 8409, August 2014
http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=8409

Labour Market Progression of Canadian Immigrant Women
By Alicia Adsera and Ana Ferrer
Discussion Paper No. 8407, August 2014
http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=8407

Return to Top

********
********

10.
New from the National Bureau of Economic Research

Immigration and the Economy of Cities and Regions
By Ethan Lewis and Giovanni Peri
NBER Working Paper No. 20428, August 2014
http://www.nber.org/papers/w20428

Return to Top

********
********

11.
New from the Migration Policy Institute

1. Fostering an Inclusive Identity Where It Matters Most: At the Local Level
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou
September 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/fostering-inclusive-identity-where-it-matters-most-local-level

2. Decentralising Immigrant Integration: Denmark’s Mainstreaming Initiatives in Employment, Education, and Social Affairs
By Martin Bak Jørgensen
September 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/decentralising-immigrant-integration-denmarks-mainstreaming-initiatives-employment

3. Building Inclusive Cities: Challenges in the Multilevel Governance of Immigrant Integration in Europe
By Dirk Gebhardt
September 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/building-inclusive-cities-challenges-multilevel-governance-immigrant-integration-europe

4. Immigrant Civic Integration and Service Access Initiatives: City-Sized Solutions for City-Sized Needs
By Margie McHugh
September 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/immigrant-civic-integration-and-service-access-initiatives-city-sized-solutions-city-sized

5. Executive Action for Unauthorized Immigrants: Estimates of the Populations that Could Receive Relief
By Randy Capps and Marc R. Rosenblum
MPI Policy Brief, September 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/executive-action-unauthorized-immigrants-estimates-populations-could-receive-relief

6. Central American Migrants and “La Bestia”: The Route, Dangers, and Government Responses
By Rodrigo Dominguez Villegas
Migration Information Source Spotlight, September 10, 2014
http://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/central-american-migrants-and-la-bestia-route-dangers-and-government-responses

Return to Top

********
********

12.
New from the Social Science Research Network

1. 7 Reasons to Abandon the Secure Communities Program
By Charis E. Kubrin, University of California, Irvine
September 6, 2014
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2492655

2. Transnational Migration, Globalization, and Governance: Reflections on the Central America – United States Immigration Crisis
By Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School
Handbook on International Legal Theory (Oxford U. Press, Forthcoming)
Cornell Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-26
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2491308

3. The Labour Market Effects of Immigration and Emigration in OECD Countries
By Frédéric Docquier, Catholic University of Louvain (UCL); Caglar Ozden, World Bank Research Department; and Giovanni Peri, University of California, Davis Department of Economics
The Economic Journal, Vol. 124, Issue 579, 2014
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2490187

4. Firm Heterogeneity and High-Skill Immigration Policy
By Anton Strezhnev, Harvard University Department of Government
APSA 2014 Annual Meeting Paper
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2453240

5. Feminists at the Border
By Jennifer M. Chacon, University of California, Irvine School of Law
Denver University Law Review, Vol. 91, No. 1, 2013
UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2014-44
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2488094

6. Does Immigration Enforcement Reduce Crime? Evidence from 'Secure Communities'
By Thomas J. Miles, University of Chicago Law School and Adam B. Cox, New York University School of Law
Journal of Law and Economics, Forthcoming
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2481051

7. Effective Remedies as Capabilities: Toward a User Perspective to Human Rights of Migrants in Belgium
By Sarah Ganty, Institut d’Etudes européennes, and Moritz Baumgärtel, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Perelman Center for Legal Philosophy
Human Rights & International Legal Discourse, Forthcoming
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2487254

8. Immigrants or Minorities? Framing Asian Americans and the Implications for American Ethnoracial Politics
By Andrew Aoki, Augsburg College
APSA 2014 Annual Meeting Paper
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2455665

Return to Top

********
********

13.
New from the International Organization for Migration

IOM Perspectives on Migration, Environment and Climate Change
September 2014
http://publications.iom.int/bookstore/free/MECCInfosheet_ClimateChangeActivities.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

14.
Annotated Research Bibliography: H-1B/Green Card/STEM Labor Shortage Issues
By Norman Matloff
University of California, Davis, Department of Computer Science
August 29, 2014
http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/AnnBib.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

15.
The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations
By Neil G. Ruiz
Global Cities Initiative, August 29, 2014,
http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2014/08/foreign%20students/foreign_students_final.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

16.
Immigrant Policy Project: 2014 Report on State Immigration Laws (Jan.-June)
National Conference of State Legislatures, August 12, 2014
http://www.ncsl.org/documents/immig/ImmigrationReportAugust2014Final.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

17.
Immigration Enforcement and Crime Control: A Study of Secure Communities
By Adam B. Cox
NYU School of Law, August 2014
http://www.law.nyu.edu/faculty/facultyprofiles/adamcox/securecommunities

Return to Top

********
********

18.
“Make Their Lives Miserable”
Israel’s Coercion of Eritrean and Sudanese Asylum Seekers to Leave Israel
Human Rights Watch, September 2014
http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/reports/israel0914_ForUpload_0.pdf

Return to Top

********
********

19.
Impacts of the Recent Economic Crisis (2008-2009) on International Migration
By Elaine Levine and Mónica Verea
http://www.cisan.unam.mx/virtuales/impactos.php

Return to Top

********
********

20.
Parental Migration and Education of Left-Behind Children: A Comparison of Two Settings
By Yao Lu
Journal of Marriage and Family
Vol. 76, No. 5, October 2014
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/jomf/2014/00000076/00000005

Return to Top

********
********

21.
Crossing the Border and Migration Duration
By Michael A. Quinn
Contemporary Economic Policy, Vol. 32, No. 4, October 2014
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/coep/2014/00000032/00000004/art00012

Return to Top

********
********

22.
Overlooking/Looking Over Neoliberal Immigration: Amnesty Policy in the ‘Nation of Immigrants’
By Leah Perry
Cultural Studies, Vol. 28, Nos. 5-6, September 2014
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/rcus/2014/00000028/F0020005/art00005

Return to Top

********
********

23.
Up Against the Wall: Re-Imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border
By Edward S. Casey and Mary Watkins

University of Texas Press, 312 pp.

Hardcover, ISBN: 0292758413, $56.94
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0292758413/centerforimmigra

Paperback, ISBN: 029275938X, $27.95
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/029275938X/centerforimmigra

Kindle, 10133 KB, ASIN: B00N3CA8C2, $16.46

Book Description: As increasing global economic disparities, violence, and climate change provoke a rising tide of forced migration, many countries and local communities are responding by building walls—literal and metaphorical—between citizens and newcomers. Up Against the Wall: Re-imagining the U.S.-Mexico Border examines the temptation to construct such walls through a penetrating analysis of the U.S. wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as investigating the walling out of Mexicans in local communities. Calling into question the building of a wall against a friendly neighboring nation, Up Against the Wall offers an analysis of the differences between borders and boundaries. This analysis opens the way to envisioning alternatives to the stark and policed divisions that are imposed by walls of all kinds. Tracing the consequences of imperialism and colonization as citizens grapple with new migrant neighbors, the book paints compelling examples from key locales affected by the wall—Nogales, Arizona vs. Nogales, Sonora; Tijuana/San Diego; and the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. An extended case study of Santa Barbara describes the creation of an internal colony in the aftermath of the U.S. conquest of Mexican land, a history that is relevant to many U.S. cities and towns.

Ranging from human rights issues in the wake of massive global migration to the role of national restorative shame in the United States for the treatment of Mexicans since 1848, the authors delve into the broad repercussions of the unjust and often tragic consequences of excluding others through walled structures along with the withholding of citizenship and full societal inclusion. Through the lens of a detailed examination of forced migration from Mexico to the United States, this transdisciplinary text, drawing on philosophy, psychology, and political theory, opens up multiple insights into how nations and communities can coexist with more justice and more compassion.

Return to Top

********
********

24.
The Right to Stay Home: How US Policy Drives Mexican Migration
By David Bacon

Beacon Press, 328 pp.

Hardcover, ISBN: 0807001619, $19.54
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0807001619/centerforimmigra

Paperback, ISBN: 0807061212, $13.96
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0807061212/centerforimmigra

Kindle, 559 KB, ASIN: B00BVJFNEM, $13.26

Book Description: People across Mexico are being forced into migration, and while 11 percent of that country’s population lives north of the US border, the decision to migrate is rarely voluntary. Free trade agreements and economic policies that exacerbate and reinforce extreme wealth disparities make it impossible for Mexicans to make a living at home. And yet when they migrate to the United States, they must grapple with criminalization, low wages, and exploitation.

In The Right to Stay Home, journalist David Bacon tells the story of the growing resistance of Mexican communities. Bacon shows how immigrant communities are fighting back—envisioning a world in which migration isn’t forced by poverty or environmental destruction and people are guaranteed the “right to stay home.” This richly detailed and comprehensive portrait of immigration reveals how the interconnected web of labor, migration, and the global economy unites farmers, migrant workers, and union organizers across borders.

In addition to incisive reporting, eleven narratives are included, giving readers the chance to hear the voices of activists themselves as they reflect on their experiences, analyze the complexities of their realities, and affirm their vision for a better world.

Return to Top

********
********

25.
Facets of Women's Migration
By Elisabetta Di Giovanni

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 145 pp.

Hardcover, ISBN: 1443861383, $57.81
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1443861383/centerforimmigra

Book Description: This volume presents original and high quality contributions on women's migration from several different perspectives. Because of its complex nature, this topic has been examined in order to bring into dialogue a variety of theoretical perspectives, within an interdisciplinary context which includes not only sociology, anthropology, psychology and political geography, but also linguistics and literature. As the papers present the results of research projects which refer to specific geographical contexts, the collection is structured around the diverse destinations of the migrations here considered: namely, the Italian city of Palermo, Italy and Europe. All the papers were presented during the sixth edition of the "Migration, Human Rights and Democracy" Summer School, organized by the University of Palermo, Italy, in September 2012, which every year focuses on specific topics concerning questions of migration and human motilities in the contemporary world.

Return to Top

********
********

26.
Diasporas, Development and Peacemaking in the Horn of Africa
By Liisa Laakso and Petri Hautaniemi

Zed Books, 240 pp.

Hardcover, ISBN: University of Texas Press, $115.79
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1783600985/centerforimmigra

Paperback, ISBN: 1783600977, $28.44
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1783600977/centerforimmigra

Book Description: Exiled populations, i.e. diaspora communities, hold a strong stake in the fate of their countries of origin. In a world becoming ever more interconnected, they engage in 'long-distance politics' towards their homelands, send financial remittances and support social development in their communities of origin. Transnational diaspora networks have thus become global forces shaping the relationship between countries, regions and continents.

This important intervention, written by scholars working at the cutting edge of diaspora and conflict, challenges the conventional wisdom that diaspora are all too often warmongers, their time abroad causing them to become more militant in their engagement with local affairs. Rather, they can and should be a force for good in bringing peace to their home countries.

Featuring in-depth case studies from the Horn of Africa - including Somalia and Ethiopia - this volume presents an essential re-thinking of a key issue in African politics and development.

Return to Top

********
********

27.
Asylum Seeking and the Global City
By Francesco Vecchio

Routledge, 242 pp.

Hardcover, ISBN: 0415858755, $137.75
http://smile.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0415858755/centerforimmigra

Kindle, 403 KB, ASIN: B00MPIW9XQ, $116.00

Book Description: Asylum seeking and the global city are two major contemporary subjects of analysis to emerge both in the literature and in public and official discourses on human rights, urban socioeconomic change and national security. Based on extensive, original ethnographic research, this book examines the situation of asylum seekers in Hong Kong and offers a narrative of their experiences related to internal and external borders, the performance of border crossing and asylum politics in the context of the global city.

Hong Kong is a city with no comprehensive legislation covering refugee claims and official and public opinion is dominated by the view that the city would be flooded with illegal economic migrants were policy changes to be implemented. This book considers why Hong Kong has become a destination for asylum seekers, how asylum seekers integrate into local and global economic markets and why the illegalization of asylum seekers plays a significant role in the processes of global city formation.

This book will be essential reading for academics and students involved in the study of migration; globalization and borders; research methods in criminology; social problems and urban sociology.

Return to Top

********
********

28.
Citizenship Studies
Vol. 18, No. 6-7, 2014, October 2014
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ccst20/current#.U-0OLWN2B3s

Selected articles:

Between punishment and discipline: comparing strategies to control unauthorized immigration in the United States
By Walter Nicholls
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2013.865906#.VBI_1mN2B3s

Citizenship and the contracting out of military work: from national conscription to globalized recruitment
By Maya Eichler
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2013.865904#.VBI_-GN2B3s

Digital citizenship? Narrative exchange and the changing terms of civic culture
By Nick Couldry, Hilde Stephansen, Aristea Fotopoulou, Richard MacDonald, Wilma Clark, and Luke Dickens
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2013.865903#.VBJAC2N2B3s

Exclusion through citizenship: civic deliberation and its limits in the Peruvian blogosphere
By Franka C. Winter
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944770#.VBJAJGN2B3s

Culture or taxes? The conceptions of citizenship of migrants and local factory workers in Italy
By Djordje Sredanovic
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944773#.VBJAUmN2B3s

How citizenship matters: narratives of stateless and citizenship choice in Estonia
By Lisa C. Fein and Jeremy B. Straughn
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944774#.VBJAfGN2B3s

Justifying grounds for multicultural policies in Korea: universal human rights versus benefits of diversity
By Nam-Kook Kim
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944777#.VBJApGN2B3s

Asylum seekers, citizenship and reality TV in the Netherlands: quizzing refugees in jeopardy
By Esther Romeyn
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944778#.VBJAwWN2B3s

Creating other options: negotiating the meanings of citizenships
By Noa Leuchter
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13621025.2014.944780#.VBI_sGN2B3s

Return to Top

********
********

29.
CSEM Newsletter
September 2014
http://csem.org.br/

English language content:

STATELESSNESS: HOPING TO ACQUIRE A NATIONALITY AND PUT DOWN ROOTS
By Valeriia Cherednichenko
. . .
Recognition by France that she is stateless has not solved Railya's problems. She is entitled to work but has struggled to find full-time employment, working sporadically as an interpreter. Initially, potential employers treated her with suspicion because they were unfamiliar with the concept of statelessness. Now, she said, they "ask fewer questions about my strange status" because they have seen her UNHCR story-telling video on YouTube.

When France registered Railya as stateless, she was also entitled to a travel document. Despite this, she continues to face problems while travelling abroad, including going back to Kazakhstan to visit her parents.

"It is an outdated document," she said of the French-issued laissez-passer, adding that "because of this travel document I get stopped at the immigration control for 2-3 hours." She said it was easier for her husband to get a visa for Kazakhstan than for her. "I am Kazakh. He is not," she added, noting the irony.

In 2011, a fed up Railya also first applied for French citizenship, but she was rejected because she was unemployed at the time. Despite this setback, Railya submitted a fresh application earlier this year, based on her marriage.

Railya had to submit the application twice because French immigration officials found an error in her husband's birth certificate. However, despite all the challenges and after searching through archives, Railya is hopeful for a positive reply.
. . .
http://csem.org.br/index.php/csem/noticias/2805-statelessness-hoping-to-acquire-a-nationality-and-put-down-roots

LEBANON: MIGRANT WORKERS’ CHILDREN EXPELLED

Lebanon is expelling locally born children of migrant workers and in some cases their mothers, ten nongovernmental organizations working in Lebanon said today. A recent decision by General Security, Lebanon’s security agency in charge of foreigners’ entry and residency, to deny residency permit renewals for a number of low-wage migrants who have had children in Lebanon and for their children disproportionately interferes with the right to family life.

Since May 2014, nearly a dozen female migrant workers, many of them longstanding residents of Lebanon, reported to human rights groups that when they went to General Security to renew residency papers for themselves and their children, they were turned down. Some were told they were not allowed to have children in Lebanon and given a short period of time to leave the country. In some cases, they said, they were given as little as 48 hours.

“Under General Security’s new directive some families are being torn apart while others are apparently being denied their livelihoods simply because they’ve had children in Lebanon,” said Nadim Houry, Middle East and North Africa deputy director at Human Rights Watch. “The Lebanese authorities have not given any justification for this new policy and should immediately revoke this directive as it interferes with the right to family life.”

Under Lebanese residency regulations, certain categories of low-wage migrants, particularly domestic workers, are not allowed to sponsor residency for their spouses or children. However, in the past, Lebanon-born children of the migrants could apply for year-long residency up until age four and then could apply for residency if they enrolled in school.
. . .
http://csem.org.br/index.php/csem/noticias/2810-lebanon-migrant-workers-children-expelled

GRUESOME EVIDENCE OF ETHNIC CLEANSING IN NORTHERN IRAQ AS ISLAMIC STATE MOVES TO WIPE OUT MINORITIES

Fresh evidence uncovered by Amnesty International indicates that members of the armed group calling itself the Islamic State (IS) have launched a systematic campaign of ethnic cleansing in northern Iraq, carrying out war crimes, including mass summary killings and abductions, against ethnic and religious minorities.

A new briefing, Ethnic cleansing on historic scale: the Islamic State’s systematic targeting of minorities in northern Iraq, published today presents a series of hair-raising accounts from survivors of massacres who describe how dozens of men and boys in the Sinjar region of northern Iraq were rounded up by Islamic State fighters, bundled into pick-up trucks and taken to village outskirts to be massacred in groups or shot individually. Hundreds, possibly thousands, of women and children, along with scores of men, from the Yezidi minority have also been abducted since the Islamic State took control of the area.

"The massacres and abductions being carried out by the Islamic State provide harrowing new evidence that a wave of ethnic cleansing against minorities is sweeping across northern Iraq,” said Donatella Rovera, Amnesty International’s Senior Crisis Response Adviser currently in northern in Iraq.
. . .
http://csem.org.br/index.php/csem/noticias/2808-gruesome-evidence-of-ethnic-cleansing-in-northern-iraq-as-islamic-state-moves-to-wipe-out-minorities

Return to Top

********
********

30.
International Journal of Refugee Law
Vol. 26, No. 3, October 2014
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3?etoc

Articles:

Why We Should Use the Term ‘Illegalized’ Refugee or Immigrant: A Commentary
By Harald Bauder
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3/327.abstract?etoc

Detention of Undocumented Immigrants and the Judicial Impact of the CJEU’s Decisions in France
By Ana Beduschi
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3/333.abstract?etoc

Exclusion from Refugee Status: The Purposes and Principles of the United Nations and Article 1F(c) of the Refugee Convention
By Sandesh Sivakumaran
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3/350.abstract?etoc

International Humanitarian Law and the Interpretation of ‘Persecution’ in Article 1A(2) CSR51
By Eric Fripp
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3/382.abstract?etoc

Natural Disasters, Climate Change and Non-Refoulement: What Scope for Resisting Expulsion under Articles 3 and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights?
By Matthew Scott
http://ijrl.oxfordjournals.org/content/26/3/404.abstract?etoc

Return to Top

********
********

31.
Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Vol. 40, No. 10, October 2014
http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cjms20/40/10#.VA4I_2N2B3s

Selected articles:

Living in Fear: Rejected Asylum Seekers Living as Irregular Migrants in England
By Alice Bloch
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.859070#.VA4JFmN2B3s

The Intergenerational Transmission of Intermarriage Attitudes and Intergroup Friendships: The Role of Turkish Migrant Parents
By Sarah Carol
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.872557#.VA4JNmN2B3s

Immigrants' Participation in Voting: Exposure, Resilience, and Transferability
By Bogdan Voicu and Mircea Comsa
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.873712#.VA4Jg2N2B3s

Associational Involvement, Social Capital and the Political Participation of Ethno-Religious Minorities: The Case of Muslims in Switzerland
By Marco Giugni, Noémi Michel, and Matteo Gianni
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.864948#.VA4JwmN2B3s

Educational and Occupational Ambitions among the Spanish ‘Second Generation’: The Case of Barcelona
By Amado Alarcón, Sònia Parella, and Jessica Yiu
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.831550#.VA4JpWN2B3s

Pathways to Integration: Cross-cultural Adaptations to the Housing Market in Oslo
By Susanne Soholt
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.859069#.VA4KBmN2B3s

The Invisible Second Generation? Statistical Discrimination and Immigrant Stereotypes in Employment Processes in Norway
By Arnfinn H. Midtboen
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369183X.2013.847784#.VA4J8mN2B3s

Return to Top

********
********

32.
Journal of Refugee Studies
Vol. 27, No. 3, September 2014
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3?etoc

Articles:

The Pursuit of State Status and the Shift toward International Norms: South Korea’s Evolution as a Host Country for Refugees
By Hans Schattle and Jennifer McCann
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/317.abstract?etoc

Gender, Securitization and Transit: Refugee Women and the Journey to the EU
By Alison Gerard and Sharon Pickering
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/338.abstract?etoc

Neither Temporary, Nor Permanent: The Precarious Employment Experiences of Refugee Claimants in Canada
By Samantha Jackson and Harald Bauder
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/360.abstract?etoc

Riotous Refugees or Systemic Injustice? A Sociological Examination of Riots in Australian Immigration Detention Centres
By Lucy Fiske
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/382.abstract?etoc

‘I am a Widow, Mother and Refugee’: Narratives of Two Refugee Widows Resettled to Australia
By Caroline Lenette
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/403.abstract?etoc

Local Currencies: A Potential Solution for Liquidity Problems in Refugee Camp Economies
By Brent Ranalli
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/422.abstract?etoc

Where ‘Difference is the Norm’: Exploring Refugee Student Ethnic Identityevelopment, Acculturation, and Agency at Shaw Academy
By Oluchi C. Nwosu and Sandra L. Barnes
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/434.abstract?etoc

Beyond the Law: Power, Discretion, and Bureaucracy in the Management ofsylum Space in Thailand
By Adam Saltsman
http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/27/3/457.abstract?etoc

Return to Top